Outlining 2.0

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I’m currently 2.5 weeks into my outlining exercise. An exercise I was GREATLY dreading to even try, and I must say it started very rocky. I’m a discovery writer by nature. I have a scene in my head and I HAVE to write it down… like now! But I see the value in an outline, especially when I hit transition scenes that I tend to get stuck on. Areas where my characters need to get from one scene in my head to the next. I often stop writing a story for a while when I hit these points, I’m stumped on how to continue.

Here is a basic road map of how I went about this adventure.

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500 Word Drabble – Shrimps

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Sneakers squeaked on the polished floor as they waited for the bodies to thin out. One by one being called forward from the line of scrutiny. Until only five remained. The same five as last time… and the time before that.

Knuckles rapped on a clipboard. “Well boys,” the graying teacher stated. “Looks like you five are a team… again. Feels just like High school ‘all’ over again, huh?”

The four divided teams were given different color jerseys and a shiny new ball before heading to their designated courts.

Neck muscles strained to look his, much taller, opponent in the eyes. Rion was not surprised by the overconfident smirk he found. As the coach pointed out, nothing had changed.

“You shrimps ready to get you’re asses handed to you?”

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Outlining is Hard

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I will be the first to admit that I hate outlining. It is not that I think it is unimportant, it is just that I do not enjoy it… Or, at least,I have not enjoyed that little bit I have attempted. I feel that if I have some time to set aside to focus on writing, I’d rather be actually submersed in the story and writing it out. Not putting on paper what I ‘plan’ to write.

I know I’m not alone in this. There are two pretty distinct classes of writer: the Outliner and the Discovery writer. I am very firmly the second and when researching about famous authors you’ll see that the line on this is pretty half and half. There are, of course, also writers who move along the scale between these two definitions, finding a comfortable position for themselves.

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Listening to Podcasts

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A couple years ago I had a good friend and writing buddy suggest a podcast to me. Now, I have never listened to a podcast before, and really, I’m bad at keeping an eye on anything that is offered at a consistent basis. I tend to get a bug about something, watch/listen/research what I’m interested in immediately and then never think of it again.

But I gave this a shot, I was also poked at consistently to start listening to the podcast, so I gave into peer pressure. :) I must say it is the single most useful resource I have come across in my writing career. My only wish is that there was more.

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Japanese Kitsune

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s12tkwI have forever been in awe of Japanese culture, writings, art and folklore. One of my favorites being the Kitsune.

Kitsune is the Japanese word for fox. Foxes are a common subject of Japanese folklore. They are a type of yokai, or spiritual entity, and the word kitsune is often translated as fox spirit.

Stories depict them as intelligent beings and as possessing magical abilities that increase with their age and wisdom. Some folktales speak of kitsune employing this ability to trick others—as foxes in folklore often do.

The more tails a kitsune has—they may have as many as nine—the older, wiser, and more powerful it is.Some folktales say that a fox will only grow additional tails after it has lived 100 years. When a kitsune gains its ninth tail, its fur becomes white or gold.

500 Word Drabble – Spy

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The events that played on the monitors were numerous. Some… good deeds. Some… definitely not so good. And a few had Rommy wondering what had become of humans throughout the years. But, with his plain black coffee mug set in its normal spot, the man leaned back in the reclining chair, ready to start his evening of ‘people watching’.

His job was to spot anything out of the norm and warn those who would take care of it. A duty suited for a security guard getting up in his years. The younger guards could have dirty work. He had paid his dues after thirty-two years, his special order chair had been ‘earned’.

Now his working evenings were spent in front of three monitors, watching the events on each as if they were his own TV channels.

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